How Do I Get My Doctor To Help Me Document The Full Extent Of My Child’s Head Injury?

The head is the most common body region injured in motor vehicle crashes for children age birth to seven years and head injury outcome in children can be worse than similar injuries sustained by adults.

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can experience lasting or late-appearing neuropsychological problems. For this reason, head injuries should be of particular concern to parents of children injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes. Proper diagnosis and treatment is critical. So is marshalling the legal evidence necessary to prove the link between the crash or other trauma and your child’s deficits. Proving future deficits is one of the most vexing issues that arise in child head injury cases.

In children, some neurological deficits after head trauma may not manifest for many years. Consider that frontal lobe functions develop relatively late in a child’s growth, so that injury to the frontal lobes may not become apparent until the child reaches adolescence when higher level reasoning develops. Since the frontal lobes control social interactions and interpersonal skills, early childhood brain damage may not manifest until such frontal lobe skills are called into play later in development. Likewise, injury to reading and writing centers in the brain may not become apparent until the child reaches school age and shows signs of delayed reading and writing skills.

How can you obtain compensation now for deficits that may not show up until many years later? How can you prove now what may happen later? Head injury legal claims are challenging precisely because of these kinds of considerations.

The standard for admitting evidence on considerations of this nature is “a reasonable degree of medical certainty.” Your child’s doctor must be willing to testify to a “reasonable degree of medical certainty” that the trauma sustained by your child caused or will cause the future deficits. What does this phrase “a reasonable degree of medical certainty” mean?

It’s been observed that the phrase is almost an oxymoron. Normally the word “certainty” means certain. But the adjective “reasonable” negates the absolute connotation of the word “certainty.” But if you push past the awkwardness of the phrase to how it is employed in the courtroom it makes more sense. In actual trial practice the evidentiary standard is “more likely than not” or “more probable than not.” This is a lower standard of proof than certainty and also lower than the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard (which is the standard used to convict a defendant in criminal cases). Essentially the standard is whether your doctor can say that it is “more likely than not” that the trauma will cause your child to suffer a particular deficit in the future.

Many medical doctors don’t understand what I said in the last paragraph. They don’t want to get involved with a legal claim unless there is overwhelming proof that the trauma caused a deficit. They in effect think there must be enough evidence to prove it “beyond a reasonable doubt.” They are not aware of the correct legal standard. This is unfortunate as it results in many families not getting enough compensation to provide for the future care of their injured child.

I talk with my client’s doctors before they give any testimony and educate them on the correct standard of proof. I ask them to tell the truth, no matter what that may be. I request that they review their treatment of the child with an eye toward helping the family prove all related deficits that have or may flow from the trauma. I encourage them to understand that the law only allows the family “one bite of the apple”, one chance to get justice, and that when the legal claims ends they can never reopen the case even if it turns out their child has far more profound deficits than we proved.

If your child has suffered a head injury, you are dealing with one of the most complex and challenging of all claims. You would benefit greatly from talking to an attorney. There are many related issues that arise in the context of child TBI claims that are not for the uninitiated. Please call me if, due to the fault of another, your child has sustained a brain injury. The call is free, you are under no obligation to hire me, and I will do my best to point you in the right direction.

Sources: http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811325.pdf

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Attorney Pete Pearson practices law in Atlanta, Georgia and has a special interest in helping families with injured children. He is a father to seven and lives with his wife and children near Atlanta, Georgia. He can be reached directly at Six-Seven-Eight 358-2564 or through his main site, www.petepearsonlaw.com.

 

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